Telegraph Cove Welcomes Prince of Whales

Telegraph Cove Resort, a picturesque destination on the northeast coast of Vancouver Island, is teaming up with Prince of Whales Whale & Marine Wildlife Adventures to enhance marine wildlife habitat and research while providing greater opportunities for outstanding eco-tourism.

Resort owners Gordie and Marilyn Graham are pleased to welcome one of the province’s largest and most-respected whale watching and eco-adventure companies to their recreational seaside haven.

“I’ve always been impressed by the Prince of Whales’ work in marine conservation and academic research,” Gordie said. “Their principled approach dovetails perfectly with our continuing efforts to protect marine wildlife while delighting and educating visitors with awe-inspiring experiences in nature.”

The Grahams established a campground and marina at Telegraph Cove in 1979, drawing enthusiasts to the great recreational ocean fishing. Over 40 years, their work restoring original buildings for tourist accommodation has brought life back to the former sawmill town. Today, the resort, which can accommodate up to 500 guests, also includes a restaurant and pub, general store, small hotel and Telegraph Cove’s Whale Interpretative Centre. One of the last boardwalk settlements left on Vancouver Island, Telegraph Cove attracts thousands of whale watchers, fishermen, boaters, campers and kayakers every year.

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New Distance Guidelines for Whale Watching

At Prince of Whales Whale Watching, what motivated the inception of our journey–and what continues to guide us every day–is a sense of responsibility for where we live, including the wildlife we encounter on every tour. From North Pacific seabirds to island-dwelling deer, ocean-bathing sea lions, and our majestic cetaceans, nothing incites more passion for environmental concern. Understandably, we want to do everything we can to assure these animals are able to enjoy the place they call home.

The Brass Tacks of Wildlife Photography

Whale watching, in particular, makes photography notably difficult. What some may not know precisely because of the bounty of phenomenal professional whale photography on the internet, is that orcas and other cetaceans only fleetingly surface.

New Mercury Engine SeaPro Series Installed on Zodiacs

When looking at whale research, under-water sound is a huge factor in considering cetacean health and wellbeing. Most whales use a variation of their own pitches to socialize and communicate with eachother, as well as to locate their food. The noises they make vary from clicks and whistles to pulsed calls.

CK-9: the Conservation Canines

What is the best way to track the behaviors of marine life? We’ll bet ‘canines’ isn’t the first answer that comes to mind. But that’s exactly what a program called CK-9 Orca Skat has implemented through The University of Washington’s Center for Conservation Biology.

Experience Race Rocks Ecological Reserve

Whether you’ve been on an eco-tour of the Salish Sea with the Prince of Whales Whale Watching or you’ve browsed through some of the stunning imagery on our social media channels, it’s likely you’ve seen the ethereal beauty of the Race Rock Ecological Reserve. 

Memories of a Whale Watcher’s Daughter

It was a bright, cloudless day in early April and we were seated on the sun-drenched deck of the Prince of Whales Whale Watching’s stunning, 95 passenger Salish Sea Dream catamaran. Elspeth McGillivray, the daughter of this Victoria-staple company’s owner, Alan, was here to speak with us about growing up under her entrepreneurial father, and to offer her own insight into the ever-evolving operations behind this family-owned, eco-adventure business.

World Oceans Day 2018!

Taking a bold environmental stance in response to the ever-expanding conservation research, the City of Vancouver has announced a ban on plastic straws. This proclamation comes in lockstep with World Oceans Day, a global awareness day with an annually rotating theme. In 2018, that theme is the accumulation of plastic in our big blue.

5 Fascinating Animals of the Pacific Northwest

The Pacific Northwest is known for the ethereal beauty of its great outdoors. The abrupt summits and serene waters intersect with hues of luminous greens and deep blues––of the like to inspire one of the great artists of our time: Emily Carr. However, unlike the equally stunning landscapes of far-flung regions like Madagascar, the Congo, or Costa Rica, our wildlife get less of the global limelight.