New state-of-the-art ship to help reduce noise and environmental footprint

VICTORIA – The Salish Sea Dream, Prince of Whales’ new $3.5 million environmentally-friendly custom-built catamaran has had such a successful inaugural season running unique whale watching day trips between Vancouver and Victoria and Victoria and Butchart Gardens, that the company has just placed an order for another state-of-the-art ship that will be even more environmentally friendly.

“It’s very stable, very reliable and it’s proved to be an amazing platform for tours so we’ve had rave reviews from our guests,” says Prince of Whales Whale Watching owner Alan McGillivray. “Business was up more than 30 per cent on these tours; we had many sold-out days and we saw whales every single day.”

McGillivray says the 2017 season was the best whale watching season they’ve ever had in terms of sightings, especially for humpbacks and transient killer whales.

“We had lots of humpback sightings and an abundance of other sightings as well,” McGillivray says. “They think there are about 300 transients between Mexico and Alaska and we believe we saw more than 100 unique transients this season, which is quite phenomenal.”

Protecting the environment is a top priority for Prince of Whales,

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Whale Photography 101

We live in a world of perpetual documentation. Everyone wants to be the person to record every pivotal moment in their lives (or their food, whatever, we’re not here to judge). This has given rise to the idea that everyone is a photographer.

Among the people that lament this fact the most, are wildlife photographers. Actual, real-life, professional, photographers. The investment they have made in their equipment, training, skill, and time is phenomenal, and yet they regularly witness people with a 3-year-old smart phone, taking a photo through a window, hoping to get National Geographic quality shots.

That’s probably not gonna happen.

One of the reasons we humans find wildlife photography so darn stunning, is because it often captures things that we can’t see with our naked eye. Sometimes this is because us non-wildlife-photographers don’t have the time or patience to wait the hours, days (or sometimes weeks/months!) required to get the shot we desire. More often, it’s because human eyes physically can’t see far enough, or process images fast enough, to see the details that make wildlife photography so compelling. Remember when an Australian photographer caught a sea lion riding a whale?

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“A DAM GOOD IDEA”

Pacific Whale Watch Association (PWWA) Applauds Decision Today to Remove Antiquated Dams Along Klamath River, Restoring Major Salmon Source for Southern Resident Orcas

The Obama administration and California officials announced a landmark agreement today to remove four hydroelectric dams along the Klamath River, bypassing an inactive Congress and beginning the largest river restoration in U.S. history – and rebuilding a major food source for endangered Southern Resident orcas.

The Pacific Whale Watch Association thinks it’s a dam good idea.

The announcement came in a news conference today at the Yurok Reservation in Klamath with California Gov. Jerry Brown and Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, NOAA Fisheries Administrator Kathryn Sullivan, and Stefan Bird, CEO of Pacific Power, a division of PacifiCorp, owner of the dams. The project, once completed in 2020, will open up an estimated 500 miles of steelhead habitat and about 420 miles for salmon.

“This historic agreement means that the third-largest salmon-producing river system within the Critical Habitat of these endangered orcas is now back in play,” explains Jeff Friedman, U.S. President of PWWA, which represents 36 operators in Washington and British Columbia. “In just a few years we hope to have healthy runs of salmon including Chinook awaiting these whales at a crucial halfway point between the Columbia and Sacramento Rivers.

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